US

Recall Issued for Salads That Contain Ingredient Not Listed on Label

By Zachary Stieber

A recall has been issued for Ceasar salads that contain an allergen that wasn’t declared on the label, federal authorities said.

The salads were produced by Taylor Farms Texas, based in Texas.

They contained anchovies, a known allergen, but didn’t list anchovies on the label, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service.

The ready-to-eat salads, which included chicken, were distributed in Texas.

Ceasar salads produced by Taylor Farms Texas had anchovies despite anchovies not being listed on the label. (U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service.)

The problem was found by a worker at a retail store when the products were being unpacked to be placed on the retail store shelves.

Approximately 1,079 pounds of the products were recalled. They were produced on May 8.

The product was described as follows: 9.75 oz. clear plastic packages containing “H.E.B. SHAKE, RATTLE & BOWL CAESAR SALAD with CHICKEN” and a “BEST BY” date of MAY 18, 2019, represented on the label.

The product beats the establishment number “EST. P-34733” inside the USDA mark of inspection.

There haven’t been any reports of people getting sick after eating the salad and anyone who thinks they got sick from eating the product should contact a doctor.

Anyone with questions about the recall can contact Kelsey Adams, quality analyst at Taylor Farms at (214) 565-4847.

The chicken product recalled in May. (U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service.)

Another Product Recalled

The recall came about a week after approximately 1,589 pounds of chicken products were recalled for the same issue, an undeclared allergen, in this case soy.

The ready-to-eat chicken Thai-style meatballs were produced by Santa Fe Importers, based in California, and produced and packaged on April 24.

All the items bear the establishment number “EST. P-4118” inside the USDA mark of inspection.

The product was shipped to a distribution center in California and packed to be sold at Lemonade restaurants.

“Santa Fe Importers, Inc. notified FSIS of the problem after the company learned that the bread crumbs used to make the meatballs contained soy lecithin,” the Food Safety and Inspection Service stated.

“There have been no confirmed reports of adverse reactions due to consumption of these products. Anyone concerned about an injury or illness should contact a healthcare provider.”

The product was described as follows:

Anyone who bought the meatballs should throw them out or return them for a refund.

Consumers and members of the media with questions about the recall were told to contact Jorge Endara, general manager of Santa Fe Importers, Inc., at (562) 437-7775 or at Jorge@SanteFeImporters.com.

Tyson Foods said on May 4, 2019, that it was voluntarily recalling over 1 million pounds of chicken strips
Tyson Foods said on May 4, 2019, that it was voluntarily recalling over 1 million pounds of chicken strips because they might contain pieces of metal. (U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service)

Tyson Recall

Also in May, Tyson Foods issued a nationwide recall of over 11 million pounds of chicken strips.

The Arkansas-based company produced chicken strips that could be contaminated with extraneous materials, specifically pieces of metal, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service.

The chicken strips were shipped to retail and Department of Defense locations nationwide. They were also being used in institutions across the country. Two consumers found pieces of metal in their Tyson chicken strips and alerted the service, which said that it’s now aware of six complaints and three injuries from the issue. The health risk for the alert is listed as high.

The products were produced from Oct. 1, 2018, to March 8, 2019, and have “Use By Dates” on the packages of Oct. 1, 2019, through March 7, 2020. All of the products bear the establishment number “P-7221” on the back of the package.

Consumers with questions about the recall can contact Tyson Foods Consumer Relations at 1-866-886-8456. In a statement, the company said it was issuing the recall “in the interest of public health even though the vast majority of the products have already been consumed without any reported incidents.” It wasn’t clear whether the company had been informed of the three illnesses.

“We have discontinued use of the specific equipment believed to be associated with the metal fragments, and we will be installing metal-detecting X-ray machinery to replace the plant’s existing metal-detection system. We will also be using a third-party video auditing system for metal-detection verification,” said Barbara Masters vice president of regulatory food policy, food, and agriculture for Tyson Foods, in a statement.

There was a range of products that were recalled. To see a full list, click on this link (pdf).